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The scene in front of clinics where abortions are performed is often tense, with clinic workers escorting patients past activists waving signs and taking photographs.

But increasingly, another drama is unfolding out back. There, abortion opponents dig through the trash in search of patient information.

Police In Peru Treat Lost Penguin To Dinner

Aug 27, 2015
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Chinese authorities detained a dozen people on Thursday in connection with an explosion in the Chinese port city of Tianjin that left at least 139 people dead.

Reporting from Shanghai, NPR's Frank Langfit filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Police Chief Delivers His Own Baby

Aug 27, 2015
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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. The movie "Fargo" features Frances McDormand as a police chief investigating a crime while suffering morning sickness.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "FARGO")

BRUCE BOHNE: (As Lou) You see something down there, chief?

More Americans say they would vote for a Muslim or an atheist for president than they would for a socialist, according to a recent Gallup Poll. Yet "socialist" is now how Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has described himself throughout his career.

Sanders has not run from the term, even as he surges in his race for president.

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A gunman in Virginia murdered two television journalists, Alison Parker and Adam Ward, as they conducted a live on-air interview on Wednesday. The suspect, Vester Lee Flanagan, apparently had a camera.

Flanagan didn't just want to shoot the victims. He wanted to film himself in the act of committing murder.

More than 21,000 people are out of work this year from California's drought, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. The majority are in agriculture. Those farmworkers lucky enough to have a job are often working harder for less money.

Leaning forward and crouching from the waist, Anastacio picks strawberries from plants about as tall as his knees. We're not using his last name because Anastacio and his family are undocumented.

While prolonged drought has strained California agriculture, most of the state's farms, it seems, aren't just surviving it: They are prospering.

The environment, though, that's another story. We'll get to that.

It may not have the dazzle of a royal wedding, but the annual "swan upping" is one of the oldest events in the British royal calendar.

Every English summer, men in red blazers and white trousers spend a week rowing up the River Thames, lifting the swans and counting them as locals and tourists look on.

With more than 1 million people coming to Philadelphia when Pope Francis visits next month, enterprising businesses are coming up with stuff to remember him by, and it's not just rosary beads.

There's a growing market for "unofficial" pope swag that's a bit more irreverent — and edible.

Several local breweries are praying beer drinkers will adore their papal-themed libations.

The folks at Manayunk Brewing Co. recently created a brew they're calling Papal Pleasure, a Belgian amber ale that's a nod to the pontiff's Argentine roots.

Animals, including humans, feel sound as well as hear it, and some of the most meaningful audio communication happens at frequencies that people can't hear. Elephants, for example, use these low-frequency rumbles to, among other things, find family or a mate across long distances. Whales do it, too.

Seven deputies in Klamath County, Ore., have been on leave this week, after county commissioners agreed to their request. The move comes a month after Klamath County Sheriff Frank Skrah learned he was being investigated by Oregon's Department of Justice.

Citing an attorney who represents the Klamath County Peace Officers Association, Oregon Public Broadcasting says the deputies feared retaliation from the sheriff, after they were interviewed by the Oregon Department of Justice.

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In hopes that it can persuade Congress to drop its prohibition on transferring detainees in Guantanamo to American soil, the White House is hunting for a highly secure place in the U.S. for some 50 detainees. Labeled as "enemy combatants," they've been held for more than a decade without trial in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, at a camp President Obama has promised to close.

Unlike the 52 other captives at Guantanamo whose release can occur as soon as a country is found to take them, these detainees are considered too dangerous to release at all. They're known as "unreleasables."

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And it's not you. The traffic is getting worse.

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The U.S. financial markets finally closed on a high note Wednesday, with gains of nearly 4 percent seen in both the Dow Jones index and the S&P 500 — and even higher gains for the Nasdaq index.

The rally follows six days of losses for markets that have been shaken by news about China's currency and economy.

NPR's Joel Rose reports:

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Amelia Boynton Robinson died today in Alabama. She was 104 years old. Robinson was a civil rights activist who helped organize what became known as the Bloody Sunday march of 1965. Kyle Gassiott of Troy Public Radio has this remembrance.

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Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans today is smaller than when the storm hit, with 110,000 fewer people than the nearly half-million who had lived there. But the city's recovery is a story that varies with each neighborhood. In some neighborhoods, like the Lower Ninth Ward, many residents never returned. Others, like the French Quarter, have seen many newcomers and now have more households than they did in 2005.

Here's an awkward situation. You're in Hawaii with your spouse, vacationing. And you find out you've been exposed as part of an adultery website. Your email is in the Ashley Madison data that hackers leaked. This is precisely the situation in which Casey Corcoran found himself.

An Awkward Moment

Over the weekend, Corcoran and his wife were in a hotel room overlooking the ocean. It was about 6:30 p.m.

In animal husbandry, the word "cull" means to remove undesirable animals from the herd — the scrawny and the sickly.

Vester Lee Flanagan, who police say shot and killed two of his former colleagues from a Virginia TV station before dying hours later of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, seems to have sent a 23-page fax to ABC News that discusses his reasons for the attack.

Angelo Alonzo, a resident of Portland, Maine, says he nearly died last month after injecting what he believed to be a safe dose of heroin — the same amount he's taken before. But this time, he says, the drug knocked him to his knees.

"An amount that usually gives me a good mellow high was just way too much," he says, "and I woke up in the shower and I was cold. And I didn't put myself there."

Can't watch your local news channel? It's not your TV that's broken.

Negotiations between Dish Network and Sinclair Broadcast Group have broken down, resulting in the blackout of 129 local stations across the country. It's the largest TV blackout ever in the U.S.

The standoff prompted Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler to order a meeting today with the two companies to resolve the dispute.

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