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Saying that "I messed up," Netflix CEO Reed Hastings announced late Sunday evening that after many complaints from its customers about a 60 percent increase in its fees, the company is splitting its services.

Soon, if you just want DVDs-by-mail, you'll be dealing with Qwikster (Hastings says the name "refers to quick delivery).

If you want to stream movies and other content, the company you'll be using will still be called Netflix.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, this summer has been the second-hottest ever recorded in the United States, helping to push power demand in homes to record levels. As some worry that the growing use of fossil fuels to produce electricity for cooling is unsustainable, one man is urging Americans to live without air conditioning.

Monterey Jazz Festival 2011: Fast Footwork And East Bay Voices

Sep 18, 2011

The town of Monterey, California, has reinvented itself several times. It was once a capital city when California was Spanish territory, and even when Mexico became independent. It was an important fishing town, as chronicled in the novels of John Steinbeck. And these days, tourism helps drive the local economy, with attractions like a world-famous aquarium, world-class golf clubs nearby like Pebble Beach, and the world's oldest continuously-running jazz festival.

Former President Jimmy Carter urges the United States to not veto the Security Council vote for Palestinian statehood anticipated to take place next week.

"If I were president, I'd be very glad to see the Palestinians have a nation recognized by the United Nations," Carter tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered. "There's no downside to it."

Carter admits that for President Obama, failure to veto "would have some adverse effects perhaps on his political future."

This Machine Can Suck Carbon Out Of The Air

Sep 15, 2011

David Keith is a bit fidgety. Maybe that's because venture capitalists have asked to come see his carbon dioxide machine. Maybe it's because the project is running months behind schedule, as experiments so often do. Maybe it's because his critics say it'll never work.

Or maybe it's a taste of excitement, because it seems entirely possible that the trailer-truck-size machine that he's leaning up against is actually going to work.

"It's amazing to see all this talk and paper get turned into hardware," he says. "I really love it."

In 1985, when I was in the midst of a 12-year struggle to write my first novel, I had the good fortune to be invited to the Edna St. Vincent Millay Colony in Austerlitz, N.Y., for a monthlong residency. There, in the colony's curved-roof barn, I happened to pick up a paperback copy of Robert Stone's 1981 novel, A Flag for Sunrise.

A few years ago, I had a work assignment in central Malaysia. When I returned home, I lamented to a friend that I was constantly lost, never knew if I had enough ringgits for a meal, and was unable to communicate with anyone. I felt like a confused child.

My friend laughed. "Now you know how your father felt when he arrived in this country," she said.

The vibrancy of American democracy is such that the debates over how best to memorialize 9/11 have been fierce these past 10 years. So, it's not surprising that some listeners Sunday were disaffected by NPR's 13 hours of live anniversary coverage, too.

The complaints ranged from what was seen as disrespectful interruptions during moments of silence, to inappropriate voice-overs during the reading of victims' names, to simply too much.

When I was a kid, I assumed that in the future things would get better and better until we were all driving flying cars and playing badminton with space aliens on top of 500-story buildings. Frankly, I kind of counted on this happening. But now I don't assume that we'll just keep going up anymore.

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