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Art & Design
10:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

At NYC's Chelsea Hotel, The End Of An Artistic Era?

The view from Madonna's former room at the Chelsea Hotel, where she lived after coming to New York in the early 1980s.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:26 am

The fabled Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan was home to Mark Twain, Virgil Thomson and Brendan Behan. Arthur C. Clarke wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey, there. Jack Kerouac worked on On the Road. Bob Dylan wrote "Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands." Artists Larry Rivers and Mark Rothko, and scores of painters and photographers also spent creative time there. But now the future of the hotel is up in the air.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Shortages Lead Doctors To Ration Critical Drugs

Laura Zakhar connects her son, Kevin, 15, to the "feedbag" that contains his nutrition. Lately, Zakhar has had trouble getting the calcium solution Kevin needs, in part because hospitals have been reserving limited supplies for patients who need it even more desperately than he does.
Elizabeth Larkin for NPR

Drug shortages mean a growing number of Americans aren't getting the medications they need. That's causing drug companies and doctors to ration available medications in some cases.

"We're now at 213 shortages for this year," says Erin Fox of the University of Utah, who tracks national drug shortages. "That surpasses last year's total of 211. And it doesn't seem like there's an end in sight."

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Law
10:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

In New Term, Supreme Court To Tackle Divisive Issues

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 5:19 am

If the U.S. Supreme Court term opening Monday were a Broadway show, all eyes would be on the stars waiting in the wings.

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Asia
10:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

China's Red-Hot Growth Gives Policymakers Pause

Earlier this year, Shanghai tried to slow down real estate sales by restricting some deals. It's part of a broader Chinese government plan to slow the country's staggering growth.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 5:19 am

The U.S. economy is struggling to grow. The European Union is trying to contain a debt crisis. And, in a case of bad timing, the world's fastest-growing major economy, China, is trying to slow down.

Shanghai has been one of the world's hottest real estate markets, but it's too hot for Chinese officials who are fighting high inflation and what some fear is a housing bubble.

Earlier this year, the Shanghai government tried to slow down real estate sales by restricting people from outside the city from buying more than one property.

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Politics
10:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Debt Committee's Failsafe Might Already Be Undone

The debt reduction supercommittee had its first public meeting Tuesday. It would take at least seven of the supercommittee's politically divided members to approve any plan they come up with.

J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 5:19 am

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction — also known as the supercommittee — created by Congress this summer has just seven weeks to agree on a plan reducing projected deficits by more than a trillion dollars.

If that panel of six Democrats and six Republicans deadlocks, or if Congress rejects its work, by law automatic across-the-board budget cuts — half of them from defense spending — will be triggered. Already, talk is growing of undoing that trigger.

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NPR Story
4:34 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

NPR Names New CEO

NPR has named a new president and chief executive officer: Gary Knell, president and CEO of Sesame Workshop, the company that produces Sesame Street.

The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

NPR Names Gary Knell As New CEO/President

Incoming NPR CEO and President Gary Knell.
Sesame Workshop

Gary Knell, president and CEO of Sesame Workshop – producers of the Sesame Street educational children's TV show — has been named the new CEO and president of NPR. The news was broken this hour on Weekend All Things Considered. Knell will take the positions on Dec. 1.

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World
2:43 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Finding The Next Steps For U.S.-Pakistan Relations

The New Yorker's Dexter Filkins reported on the killing of Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad.
James Hill Knopf Books

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 2:06 am

Adm. Mike Mullen retired last week after spending four years as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff trying to improve relations between the U.S. and Pakistan.

In his parting remarks, he had some advice for his successor, Gen. Martin Dempsey.

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Author Interviews
1:36 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

The Old Man And The Boat: Hemingway On The Pilar

Ernest Hemingway (left) and his guide Carlos Gutierrez navigate Hemingway's boat, Pilar, in 1934.
Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 4:37 pm

In 1934, Ernest Hemingway was the reigning king of American letters. Just back from safari in Africa, where he'd shot rhinos and giant kudu, he seemed to be on top of the world.

The first thing he did after returning from safari was head to the Wheeler shipyard in Brooklyn, N.Y., and buy a 38-foot fishing boat he named Pilar.

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Books
1:00 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction

The Three-Minute Fiction contest is over, but the fun is just beginning. We received 3,400 stories in Round 7 and our readers from Iowa Writer's Workshop and New York University are hard at work trying to get to them of all. NPR's Lynn Neary and Bob Mondello bring two of these stories to life: "Misshapen" by Aaron Maltz and "The Young and the Old" by Alex Swiatek.

Television
12:00 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

TV's Fixation With 'The New Breed' Of '60s Women

The cast of ABC's Pan Am.
Bob D'Amico AP

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 7:13 am

The fall television season is in high gear, and there seems to be a barrage of tight skirts, panty-hosed legs and perfectly made-up faces making their way from the 1960s to the small screen.

On ABC is Pan Am, a show about airline stewardesses. There's also NBC's The Playboy Club, which following the stories of fictional bunnies in Hugh Hefner's nightclub. The networks are hoping to get on the nostalgia bandwagon after the success of Mad Men, AMC's period drama.

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Science
11:15 am
Sun October 2, 2011

When Scientists Fail, It's Time To Call In The Gamers

Proteins are incredibly complex, yet tiny — so tiny that conventional imaging techniques often can't capture them.
istockphoto.com

Researchers at the University of Washington were stumped. They were looking at a protein that causes AIDS in rhesus monkeys, but after 14 years of study, no one was able to figure out the protein's exact structure.

Researcher Firas Khatib tells Rachel Martin, host of weekends on All Things Considered, that even the most advanced imaging techniques couldn't capture this little particle.

"The reason that the problem is so hard is that proteins are so small you can't see them with a microscope," he says.

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Music Lists
7:22 am
Sun October 2, 2011

World Music With A Latin Flavor

The Congolese street band Staff Benda Billi were discovered playing outside a zoo by a group of French filmmakers.
Courtesy of the artist

As he often does during weekends on All Things Considered, Betto Arcos visits the show this week to talk about some of the best new sounds he's been spinning on Global Village, his world music program on KPFK in Los Angeles. His picks this time around include a flamenco-jazz hybrid from Spain, joropo from Colombia, canchona from Washington, D.C. (by way of El Salvador), and a Cuban-inflected dance number from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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Around the Nation
6:06 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Wall Street Protesters Plan Long-Term Occupation

A protester marches on Friday in New York City as part of larger demonstration focused on corporations, wealth and income distribution.
Mario Tama Getty Images

A protest in New York dubbed "Occupy Wall Street" appears to be settling in for the long term. Twice a day, protesters leave the tents, makeshift kitchen and free bookstore set up in Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan and begin a slow march down the sidewalk.

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Town Rallies For School Team After Theft

A Detroit high school boy's football team had its equipment stolen and its season jeopardized. But through the goodwill of the community and an NFL player, the season will go on. Host Audie Cornish has more.

Food
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Back-Porch Beekeepers Take Honey Hyperlocal

One of the spinoffs of the go-green movement has been do-it-yourself beekeeping, and it's beginning to swarm. Weekend Edition food commentator Bonny Wolf has the buzz.

National Security
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Al-Qaida's Americans Were Link To The West

Friday's drone strike in Yemen eliminated two Americans who have played a key role in the development of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. Anwar al-Awlaki and Samir Khan were, above all else, the group's bridge to the West. The group is largely made up of Yemenis and Saudis who have hardly stepped foot out of the Middle East. That made Awlaki and Khan unique. Host Audie Cornish talks with NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

Afghanistan
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Karzai Breaks Off Talks With The Taliban

In a surprising about-face, Afghan President Hamid Karzai appears to be abandoning his government's long-standing effort to hold peace talks with the Taliban in Pakistan, saying they aren't serious about negotiations. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports.

Middle East
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Syrian Army Faces Its Own Among Protesters

The Syrian government is continuing its brutal crackdown against protesters. For much of the past week, there have also been clashes between security forces and armed militants in the central town of Rastan and elsewhere. Most of those resisting the government with arms are thought to be defectors from the Syrian army. Host Audie Cornish talks with NPR's Deb Amos from Beirut, where she has been monitoring the Syrian crisis.

Politics
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Sen. Durbin Defends Reform Despite New Bank Fees

This past week, Bank of America announced plans to charge most of its debit card users $5 a month if they use the card to make purchases. The decision is meant to offset anticipated revenue losses from regulatory changes that took effect on Friday. Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois introduced those changes to last year's Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation. Durbin joins host Audie Cornish to explain why he thinks the legislation is important.

Politics
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Rick Perry Sticks To His Guns On Immigration

Texas governor Rick Perry spent the last two days in New Hampshire, his first visit since the Republican debate in which he defended a Texas law that allows illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition at state colleges. As Jon Greenberg reports, Perry faced headwinds among Republican primary voters.

Law
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Health Care Among Hot Topics Awaiting High Court

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 8:44 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, Host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. The Supreme Court returns to the bench this week after its summer recess. The new term begins tomorrow with some 50 cases on the docket. Several of them deal with hot-button political issues. Joining us for a primer on what to expect is NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Nina, welcome.

NINA TOTENBERG: Delighted to be here.

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Digital Life
6:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Dead Sea Scrolls Come Alive On Google

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 8:44 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, Host:

For 2,000 years, the Dead Sea scrolls were seen by no one. Today, they can be viewed by anyone with access to the Internet. Google and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem teamed up to put high-quality images of the scrolls online. Images of the relics - the oldest known copies of biblical text - went live on the Web last week. Jon Stokes writes about technology for Wired.com. He is also a scholar of biblical history. And he joins us from KALW in San Francisco. Jon Stokes, welcome to the program.

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The News Tip On Weekend Edition Sunday
5:44 am
Sun October 2, 2011

The News Tip: Don't Ask Them If They're Running

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie delivers remarks during the Perspectives on Leadership Forum in California on Sept. 27. Christie has been in the spotlight recently as a possible presidential candidate.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

As the field of Republican presidential candidates jostle against each other in straw polls and debates, there are rumors that the field is not done growing. This past week, the Republican governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, was in the spotlight. Headlines were written about his potential to run for the highest office in the land, but in the end, he left things more than ambiguous.

NPR's media correspondent, David Folkenflik, has this advice for journalists: Don't ask political figures if they're running for president.

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Around the Nation
2:58 am
Sun October 2, 2011

'The Gift Of Detroit': Tilling Urban Terrain

Greg Willerer (right) has a business that provides produce to 27 families through his community supported agriculture co-op in Detroit.
Jon Kalish

Detroit is a surprisingly green landscape during the spring and summer months. The site of many houses that are crumbling, boarded up or missing altogether is tempered by community gardens and even some urban farms.

There are some serious urban gardeners in this country, but few can match the agricultural output of Paul Weertz.

"I farm about 10 acres in the city, and alfalfa's my thing. I bale about a thousand bales a year," he says.

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Politics
1:09 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Federal Budget Uncertainty Weighs On Economy

Welcome to Fiscal Year 2012...such as it is.

On each Sept. 30, the nation wraps up its old budget, and on Oct. 1, it starts a fresh spending cycle. Or at least, that's what is supposed to happen.

But once again, Oct. 1 has come and gone, and the country still has no formal budget in place. Instead, Congress last week approved a stopgap funding bill to keep the government operating temporarily, just as it has done time and again since the 1970s.

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Politics
11:24 pm
Sat October 1, 2011

A Guide To The U.S. Budget Battles

Originally published on Sun October 2, 2011 8:28 am

This year, the annual budget fight has become especially muddled. That's because Congress and the White House are actually engaged in three different, but related, budget debates that are going on simultaneously.

Ultimately, the three battles involve just one question: How much money should government take in and spend? But the separate tracks involve different time horizons, and each problem has to be resolved in a different way.

Here is a fresh look at the three ongoing budget battles:

1. The Fiscal 2012 Budget

Background:

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Politics
10:41 pm
Sat October 1, 2011

In West Virginia, Obama's Policies Are On The Ballot

Voters in West Virginia will choose the state's next governor on Tuesday, in a special election to finish the term of Democrat Joe Manchin. The popular former governor left office after being elected to the U.S. Senate last November.

On the ballot are the man who has been acting governor, Democratic state Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin, and GOP businessman Bill Maloney.

But Republicans are trying to make the race a referendum on someone not on the ballot: President Obama.

'We Got To Fight Back Washington'

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Around the Nation
1:18 pm
Sat October 1, 2011

Like The Lions, Detroit Finally Has A Winning Season

Detroit Lions Jason Hanson (left) and Don Muhlbach walk off the field after Hanson kicked a 32-yard field goal in overtime to beat the Minnesota Vikings last Sunday in Minneapolis. The Lions won 26-23.
Genevieve Ross AP

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 5:27 am

After many awful seasons this year's Detroit Lions are — can you believe it — undefeated. To add to the glory, each of the Detroit car makers is showing signs of health with increased quality and profitability. It's long-awaited good news for a city that's been through bad times.

There's no denying that Detroit has had an image problem for quite a while. A whole cottage industry has sprung up over the years with many people from all walks trying to help turn that image around.

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Sat October 1, 2011

Week In News: Chris Christie For President? Still No

Originally published on Sat October 1, 2011 4:33 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, Host:

We're back with ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

CHRIS CHRISTIE:

I'm 100 percent certain I'm not going to run. I don't want to run. I don't feel like I'm ready to run. First, you have to have in your heart, you got to want it more than anything else. More than anything else. I don't want it that badly.

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