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Around the Nation
5:28 am
Tue February 28, 2012

A Touch Of Paris Arrives In Los Angeles

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A touch of Paris has arrived in L.A. Angelinos, like Parisians, can now enjoy fine dining with their pet dogs. The Health Department has deemed dogs perfectly safe as eating companions. Effective immediately, canines will be welcomed in the outdoor seating areas of restaurants. But pet dogs will be denied some elements of standard restaurant service. For one thing, dining does not include sitting on a chair. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

The Two-Way
5:22 am
Tue February 28, 2012

After Rain Then Fire, Matt Kenseth Wins Daytona 500

Matt Kenseth, driver of the #17 Best Buy Ford, celebrates in Victory Lane with champagne after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 at Daytona International Speedway on Tuesday.
Jared C. Tilton Getty Images for NASCAR

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Around the Nation
5:16 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Lost Wallet Turns Up 35 Years Later

Gean Brown Jr. was installing pipes in an attic in Spring Hill, Kan., and somehow he lost his wallet. He never expected to see it again. More than three decades later, Brown received a call last week. The current owner of that house had found the wallet.

It's All Politics
5:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Santorum Could Lose Michigan Vote But Still Gain Delegates

Polls show Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney in a tight race heading into Tuesday's Michigan primary. Santorum's campaign signs are stuck in the snow before his campaign stop at the The Colonial Valley Suites on Feb. 26 in Davison, Mich.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

If primaries and caucus victories are still all about media attention and momentum, then, yes, it's critical who wins Michigan's statewide vote Tuesday. All the more so if that winner is not Mitt Romney, who grew up there and whose dad was governor in the 1960s.

But as to collecting actual delegates for the actual GOP nomination? Tuesday's vote in Michigan probably will not matter much at all.

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Middle East
2:41 am
Tue February 28, 2012

AP Source: Israel Won't Warn U.S. Before Iran Strike

Israeli officials say they won't warn the U.S. if they decide to launch a pre-emptive strike against Iranian nuclear facilities, according to one U.S. intelligence official familiar with the discussions. The pronouncement, delivered in a series of private, top-level conversations, sets a tense tone ahead of meetings in the coming days at the White House and Capitol Hill.

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Media
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

2nd Murdoch Tabloid Focus Of Scandal

The senior police official investigating wrongdoing by journalists in London says there was a culture of illegal payments at the Sun tabloid to create a network of paid informants across the British government. The Sun is the second tabloid owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp to be the focus of wrongdoing.

Election 2012
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Romney Campaigns in Michigan

Arizona and Michigan voters cast their ballots Tuesday in the Republican presidential primary. A month ago, nobody expected these states to be consequential, but it's clear that the results could dramatically change the direction of the race.

Economy
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Where Does The Economic Recovery Stand?

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, of "The Wall Street Journal," and Zanny Minton Beddoes, of "The Economist," about how to read the latest economic signs, and whether there are any bright areas for growth.

Election 2012
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Santorum Campaigns in Michigan

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 4:54 am

Transcript

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: And I'm Sonari Glinton traveling with the Rick Santorum campaign in Kalamazoo, Michigan. While Mitt Romney was rocking out to the sounds of Kid Rock, Rick Santorum supporters were being entertained by founding father Patrick Henry.

LAWRENCE WESCO: (as Patrick Henry) I know not what course others might take, but as for me give me liberty or give me death.

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Business
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Business News

David Greene has business news.

Technology
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Google To Ramp Up Online Tracking

Privacy protections on Internet browsers are anything but ironclad. Companies circumvent them routinely. Most people know they are being observed online but figuring out how is complicated.

Business
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Ford's High-Tech Solutions May Ease Gridlock

Ford is betting technology can help relieve traffic congestion around the world. In a speech Monday, Executive Chairman Bill Ford Jr. said the company is investing in systems that will bypass traffic jams, locate parking spots and communicate with other vehicles to avoid accidents.

Middle East
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

Ordinary Israelis Ponder An Attack Against Iran

Originally published on Sun March 4, 2012 6:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's stay in the region and turned to Israel now, where concerns are growing over Iran's suspected nuclear weapons program. Israel's minister of defense travels to the U.S. today, that's ahead of that's ahead of a visit by his boss, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, next week. The subject of Iran is expected to dominate much of those high-level talks in Washington.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro visited the Israeli city of Tel Aviv to gauge concern among residents there.

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Business
2:00 am
Tue February 28, 2012

AT&T 'Throttles' Heaviest Data Users

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 3:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's talk now about a different kind of traffic jam: traffic jams on the information highway. All that data flowing through broadband Internet networks is prompting mobile phone companies to throttle some of their customers, especially the heaviest users.

We called up Rich Jaroslovsky, the technology columnist for Bloomberg News and a regular guest here on MORNING EDITION, and we asked him to explain data throttling.

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It's All Politics
11:46 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Wyoming's GOP Caucuses: The Process Is Drawn Out And Confusing

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 6:53 am

Republicans in Wyoming pick delegates for the national convention in a process that stretches from early February to mid-April. Besides being time-consuming, the process is also hard to understand.

In Wyoming, precinct caucuses are the first round of the political playoffs. Republicans from throughout the state meet in county caucuses to discuss issues, suggest platform ideas and decide whom to endorse.

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Opinion
10:01 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

The New Indian Pariahs: Vegetarians

An Indian butcher chops meat at a mutton market in Mumbai. Indians are consuming more meat than ever before, despite a tradition of vegetarianism.
Indranil Mukherjee AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 28, 2012 3:08 am

India has been home to vegetarians for centuries. Many Hindus and most Buddhists do not eat meat, but commentator Sandip Roy says in today's India, meat is what's for dinner.

When my friend Lakshmi, a lifelong vegetarian, went to America as a student more than 20 years ago she knew she was in for a hard time. Vegetarian dorm food meant a lot of cheese pizza, french fries, pasta and if she was lucky, grilled vegetables.

After 10 years in San Francisco's vegetarian mecca, when she returned to live in India a few years ago, she had an unexpected identity crisis.

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Law
10:01 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Human Rights Victims Seek Remedy At High Court

Charles Wiwa fled Nigeria in 1996 following a crackdown on protests against Shell's oil operations in the Niger Delta. Now a resident of Chicago, Wiwa and other natives of the oil-rich Ogoni region are suing Shell for human rights violations.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Human rights are front and center at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in two cases testing how American law intersects with international law. At issue in both cases is whether foreign nationals in the United States can sue corporations or other entities in U.S. courts for alleged violations of human rights.

The case that has corporate teeth chattering is a lawsuit against Royal Dutch Shell Oil, which is accused of aiding and abetting the Nigerian government in committing atrocities in the 1990s.

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Mitt Romney
10:01 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Michigan Primary A Test Of Romney's Family Legacy

A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney holds a vintage campaign poster of Romney's father, George Romney, in Albion, Mich.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:59 am

Michigan and Arizona hold presidential primaries Tuesday, and in Michigan, where Mitt Romney was born, the race has been as hard-fought as anywhere in the country.

For Romney, the campaign there has been personal. He often evokes the Michigan of his youth, when his father, George, ran American Motors and went on to become a very popular three-term governor.

But does that family legacy mean anything today?

If you were to go to a Romney event in Detroit or Kalamazoo or Traverse City, you'd be almost guaranteed to hear some Romney family history.

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The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Francona Says New No-Booze Policy In Red Sox Clubhouse Is PR Move

Former Boston Red Sox manager Terry Francona.
Elise Amendola AP

Terry Francona, who managed the Boston Red Sox for eight seasons and led the team to two World Series, says the teams' new ban on booze could backfire.

"I think it's a PR move," Francona told ESPN. "I think if a guy wants a beer, he can probably get one. You know, it's kind of the old rule ... If your coach in football says no hard liquor on the plane — I mean, you serve beer and wine — somebody's going to sneak liquor on the plane.

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National Security
3:14 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Afghan Violence Raises Questions About U.S. Strategy

The latest violence in Afghan has raised doubts about the U.S. strategy. Here, Afghan demonstrators shout anti-U.S. slogans as they carry a wounded man during a protest in the Western city of Herat on Feb. 24.
Aref Karimi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 6:27 pm

The violence against U.S. forces in Afghanistan has called into question the American exit strategy, which is set to play out steadily over the next three years.

It was only a few weeks ago that the second-ranking American military officer in Afghanistan laid out a new phase of that strategy. Small groups of U.S. advisers would team up with larger Afghan units to train them, said Lt. Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti.

The first of these U.S. assistance teams will head into Afghanistan this spring to train Afghan police and soldiers.

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It's All Politics
3:12 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Santorum, Romney Spar Over Economy Ahead Of Michigan Primary

Rick Santorum (center) Monday at St. Mary's Cultural & Banquet Center in Livonia, Mich.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

A day before Michigan's Republican presidential primary, Rick Santorum tried to outflank Mitt Romney on a fairly sensitive issue in Detroit: government bailouts.

Santorum blasted Romney for supporting the government's Wall Street bailout while loudly opposing its bailout of the auto industry.

Santorum, for his part, opposed both instances of government intervention in the private sector.

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Middle East
2:52 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

In A New Setback, Syrian Opposition Splits

A man burns a portrait of Syrian President Bashar Assad during a Sunday demonstration on the outskirts of Idlib in northern Syria.
Rodrigo Abd AP

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 5:59 pm

Monday was a rough day for the opposition in Syria. Senior officials in the main opposition group announced that they're forming a new organization. The development was the latest sign of the divisions within the Syrian opposition that's trying to oust the government of President Bashar Assad.

At the same time, Assad's government said that nearly 90 percent of voters endorsed constitutional reforms in a referendum a day earlier, even though the Syrian opposition and international critics called the balloting a farce.

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The Two-Way
2:48 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

In Kentucky, 2015 Derby Winner Could Arrive Any Day Now

This picture has stayed in Noah Adams' mind.
Dr. Kim Sprayberry Hagyard Equine Medical Institute

The horse that wins the Kentucky Derby in 2015 may come into the world tonight in the Bluegrass State.

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'Radio Diaries'
2:47 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Straight Out Of Flint: Girl Boxer Aims For Olympics

"Before boxing, I wanted to have 10 kids by the time I was 25. Now, my goal is to get this gold medal, go pro and be a world champion," says aspiring Olympic boxer Claressa Shields, 16.
Sue Jaye Johnson

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:00 am

Sixteen-year-old Claressa Shields has a dream. She's in London, at the Olympic finals for women's boxing, when the announcer calls out, "The first woman Olympian at 165 pounds — Claressa Shields!"

Claressa, a high school student and middleweight boxer from Flint, Mich., is the youngest fighter competing for a place on the U.S. Olympic women's boxing team.

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It's All Politics
2:38 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Casting Himself As Outsider, Santorum Benefited From D.C. 'Revolving Door'

On the campaign trail, Rick Santorum portrays himself as a Washington outsider. But the former senator has made money from inside-the-Beltway pursuits.
Jeff Kowalsky EPA/Landov

Rick Santorum is trying to shake up the Republican primary by winning the primary Tuesday in Michigan — and many polls show him neck and neck with Mitt Romney. He's a former senator from Pennsylvania best known as a culture warrior. What's less well known is what he did after losing his re-election bid in 2006.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:36 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Pediatricians Recommend HPV Vaccination For Boys

Connor Perruccello-McClellan, a senior at Providence Country Day School in Rhode Island, has been vaccinated against HPV, something less than 1 percent of U.S. males can say.
Richard Knox NPR

The leading group of U.S. pediatricians says it's now time for boys, as well as girls, to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidance to parents and doctors in favor of routine immunization for boys against the virus.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Red Cross Reaches Hama, Homs, Delivers Food, Medical Aid

A spokesman for the International Committee of the Red Cross tells NPR's Newscast Unit that ambulances from the Syrian Arab Red Crescent were able to evacuate three people from the Baba Amr neighborhood of Homs, which have been heavily shelled in recent days.

One of the people evacuated was "a pregnant woman in urgent need of care," said Simon Schorno, who added the ambulances "also brought in emergency medical supplies to be distributed immediately."

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All Tech Considered
2:11 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

To Get Out The Vote, Evangelicals Try Data Mining

Kay Clymer spends hours each day urging fellow Christians to vote. She finds their phone numbers through a database created by the company United In Purpose.
Steve Brown WOSU

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 5:36 pm

When Bill Dallas first heard that 15 to 20 million Christians in the U.S. are not registered to vote, he couldn't believe it.

"Initially, it surprised me. And then I thought to myself, 'Wait a minute, I'm not registered,' Dallas says. "Why wasn't I registered? Well, because I didn't think my vote made a difference."

Identifying Christians With Data Points

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Latin America
1:52 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

Violence Exposes Crisis In Latin American Prisons

In Honduras, female relatives of inmates killed during a fire at a prison argue with soldiers as they try to enter the morgue in Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital, on Feb. 20. The fire at Comayagua prison on Feb. 14 killed more than 300 inmates.
Esteban Felix AP

A series of fatal riots inside Mexican prisons last week and a deadly blaze at a penitentiary in Honduras are prompting calls for major penal reform in Central America.

Violence at three different penitentiaries in Mexico last week left 48 inmates dead, while the inferno in Honduras earlier this month killed 360 prisoners.

These deadly events underscore the problems of corruption, overcrowding, prison gangs and crumbling infrastructure that prisons face throughout the region.

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Planet Money
1:38 pm
Mon February 27, 2012

From Cell Phones To Cigarettes: The Long Arm Of The Chinese Government

How many government-owned businesses do you see in this picture?
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

The streets of Beijing and Shanghai feel like an entrepreneurial free-for-all, full of mom-and-pop stores and street vendors selling snacks and cheap toys.

But when you pull back the curtain, you see a different picture: a country where the government still controls huge swaths of the economy.

When you're in China, there's a good chance you're doing business with the government every time you:

  • make a call on your cellphone (the government owns the country's biggest cellphone network)
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