It's All Politics
1:12 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

For Romney, Rationale Behind Rubio Endorsement May Be Bigger Prize

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., talks at the Hispanic Leadership Network in Miami on Jan. 27.
Alan Diaz AP

Mitt Romney's endorsements this week by two important Republicans — a former president and perhaps a not-too-distant-future presidential running mate — are not unexpected.

But the reasons former President George H.W. Bush and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio give for backing the front-runner are a little less standard political fare.

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The Picture Show
1:11 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Found In A Closet: A Photo Trove Of '60s Icons

The found photographs of Jack Robinson include Warren Beatty, Tina Turner and Jack Nicholson
Jack Robinson Vogue/Conde Nast Archive

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:55 am

You never know what people are hiding. When Dan Oppenheimer opened the door to Jack Robinson's apartment, for example, he had no idea what he'd discover. He knew that Robinson had been a photographer in an earlier chapter of his life that he rarely spoke of.

Oppenheimer, who had been Robinson's boss at a stained-glass studio in Memphis, recalls that Robinson kept mostly to himself and had very few friends. Few people even knew he had died, which might explain why Oppenheimer found himself in this position to begin with: There was no one else to take care of the effects.

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Afropop Worldwide
1:10 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Crate Diggers and Remixers

dmc89

 

A vast, new world of DJs, record collectors and producers are going to far reaches of the Earth to find forgotten records and new styles of music. Their discoveries are then brought back home, remixed, repackaged and re-released to be heard by an entirely new audience.  We speak to some of these globetrotting DJ and producers like Chief Boima and Geko Jones to hear about their experiences, the music they’ve discovered and how they go about remixing some of these styles in order to create a new and updated sound.

Author Interviews
1:08 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

'Escape From Camp 14': Inside North Korea's Gulag

Originally published on Thu March 29, 2012 6:09 pm

Until his early 20s, the only life Shin Dong-hyuk had ever known was one of constant beatings, near starvation and snitching on others to survive. Born into one of the worst of North Korea's system of prison camps, Shin was doomed to a life of hard labor and an early death. Notions of love and family were meaningless: He saw his mother as a competitor for food.

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Native America Calling
1:02 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Native Resilience

Health Care
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

What Happens If Affordable Care Act Is Cut By Court?

What happens to the provisions of the federal health care law if the Supreme Court throws it out entirely? Melissa Block discusses that with NPR health policy correspondent Julie Rovner.

Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Parents Make Child's Death Their Cause

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

These days, the parents of Treyvon Martin are in the news every day. In the months since their son was shot to death in Sanford, Florida, they've spoken at press conferences and rallies, addressed newspaper editorial boards and even Congress.

Treyvon's father, Tracy Martin, came here to NPR this week. On the program TELL ME MORE, he spoke about the process of dealing with his son's death, saying, it will be a long time before the healing even starts.

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Politics
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Congress Passes Highway Bill To Avoid Shutdown

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It wasn't just the budget that lawmakers clashed over today. The House and Senate each passed short-term transportation bills. And that sets up yet another showdown over spending, as NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: If Congress hadn't passed the short-term transportation bills, beginning this weekend, the government wouldn't have been able to spend money on transportation programs or collect fuel taxes. Disaster averted, right?

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Review: 'Running The Rift'

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Athletes all over the world are training for the summer Olympics in London. We'll hear some of their personal stories as the games get closer. But now, a fictional story about a man who wants to reach the Olympics. "Running the Rift" is about an African athlete's struggles with his country's ethnic divisions.

Here's our reviewer, Alan Cheuse.

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Asia
12:51 pm
Thu March 29, 2012

Headed For The Butcher, Chinese Dogs Are Rescued

A volunteer feeds one of the dogs rescued from slaughter last December in a stand-off between animal rights activists and dog-meat sellers in central China. Such rescues have been taking place with some regularity in China.
Frank Langfitt NPR

Originally published on Sat March 31, 2012 6:06 pm

To say that people in China eat dogs is something of a stereotype.

Sure, some still do, but these days, more and more Chinese are buying dogs as pets and treating them like beloved family members.

In the last year, that growing affection has taken a radical turn. Activists have begun stopping trucks along the highway carrying dogs to slaughter and then negotiating their release.

A Last-Minute Rescue

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