Local News
10:42 am
Thu August 16, 2012

'West Mesa Murders' tipline helping police on other cases

Albuquerque police say efforts to solve the 2009 West Mesa serial killings are helping police find evidence in other serious cold cases.

KRQE-TV reports that police say calls to a tip line about the mystery are encouraging people to provide new information.

For example, thanks to new tips investigators have linked a slew of rape test kits to the same serial rapist who preyed on Albuquerque women in the 1990s. Police do not know who he is, but now his DNA profile is in a national database.

Local News
10:39 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Governor finds new spot to post workers' salaries

Gov. Susana Martinez has begun posting the names and salaries of classified state employees at a new online location after a judge ruled last month that she remove the names from the online New Mexico Sunshine Portal.

Martinez added the names of classified workers, their titles and salaries to the Sunshine Portal last year. That added to a previously available list of employees exempt from civil service protection.

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Participation Nation
10:33 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Spreading Their Wings In Columbus, Ohio

The butterflies of Proyecto Mariposa.
Courtesy of Yahaira Perez

For the past year Yahaira Perez has led a group called Proyecto Mariposa, or Project Butterfly, that helps provide life skills to Latina girls and their mothers while ensuring they do not forget their Latin roots.

Proyecto Mariposa is made up of 16 mothers and their daughters, ages 2 to 13. They meet weekly at a church in Columbus to make crafts, read in Spanish and receive guidance on issues such as personal health and proper nutrition.

Yahaira, who moved from Puerto Rico to attend The Ohio State University, has gotten many people involved — including her family.

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The Two-Way
10:33 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Two Deputies Killed, Two Wounded In Louisiana Shootings

Three days after the shooting death of a constable in College Station, Texas, there's word that two sheriff's deputies in Louisiana's St. John the Baptist Parish were killed this morning and another two were wounded in what appear to be connected shootings.

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Around the Nation
9:30 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Undocumented Youth Line Up For A Chance To Stay

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we go to the Democratic Republic of Congo where a rebellion has displaced hundreds of thousands of people. Could it lead to a wider regional war? We'll ask.

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Africa
9:30 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Growing DRC Tensions Threaten Regional Stability

The Democratic Republic of the Congo is struggling to deal with rebels operating in the eastern part of the country. It's alleged that some rebels are being backed by the Rwandan government. Guest host Jacki Lyden speaks to Reuter's Kinshasa correspondent, Jonny Hogg, about tensions that can threaten regional stability and renew an old rivalry.

Entertainment
9:11 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Music from Angel Fire's Composer-in-Residence

Thurs. 8/16 10a:  Each year, northern New Mexico's chamber music festival Music From Angel Fire commissions a new work from an American composer and invites that composer to be in residence at the Festival.  Over the years, composers such as Joan Tower, Roberto Sierra and Lowell Liebermann have taken part.   Host Spencer Beckwith talks with Music From Angel Fire's Artistic Director, Ida Kavafian, about the 2012 composer-in-residence, Steven Stucky.

Shots - Health Blog
8:52 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Grappling With The Uncertainty Of Alzheimer's Testing

When does it make sense to test a person for the risk of an incurable illness?
Andrei Tchernov iStockphoto.com

Counselors have long cautioned about the downsides of genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease.

For one thing, the current genetic tests for late-onset Alzheimer's — the type that develops after age 60 and is responsible for more than 90 percent of cases — only indicate a probability of getting the disease. It's not definitive. And consumers' ability to buy life insurance or long-term care coverage could be jeopardized by the results.

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The Salt
8:43 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Peaches, Beautiful And Fleeting, Thanks To Fuzzy Thin Skin

Shopper reaches for donut peaches at the Penn Quarter farmers' market in Washington, D.C.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 9:25 am

If lately you've noticed the farmers' market flooded with signs that say "donut," "cling," "whiteflesh" and "freestone," you won't be surprised to learn that August is National Peach Month. Though the juicy fruits pack the produce aisles now, in a few short months a good peach might be hard to find.

Many fruits, though harvested in other parts of the world, are available in the United States all year long. So why are peaches so seasonal, and in the winter, either difficult to find or hard as a rock?

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The Two-Way
8:33 am
Thu August 16, 2012

Cut Diplomatic Ties? Hide Him In A Crate? How Might Assange Standoff End?

Metropolitan Police Officers outside the main door of the Ecuadorian embassy in London. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is inside.
Will Oliver AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 10:27 am

Now that Ecuador has said it will give WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange asylum as he seeks to avoid being extradited from Great Britain to Sweden by hiding out in Ecuador's London embassy, news outlets are looking at the complicated legal issues involved in cases such as his.

Here are some things we've found fascinating in the coverage:

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