It's All Politics
1:18 am
Fri November 9, 2012

'Let Mitt Be Mitt': But Who Was He?

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney arrives onstage early Wednesday morning in Boston, moments before conceding defeat in the 2012 presidential election.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 8:30 pm

The postmortems for Republican Mitt Romney's presidential campaign are rolling in.

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Shots - Health News
1:18 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Stakes Rise In Malaria Battle As Cracks Appear In Drug's Armor

This 5-year-old boy was carried to a Thai malaria clinic by his mother from deep inside Myanmar. If the mother had waited even a day longer, doctors say, the child probably would have died.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 1:25 pm

Malaria remains a huge problem in much of the world, but over the past decade the number of people getting sick and dying from the disease has gone down dramatically.

Health workers attribute much of this progress to the widespread use of artemisinin-based drugs. The problem now is that resistance to these drugs is starting to develop in Southeast Asia.

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Asia
1:16 am
Fri November 9, 2012

For China's Rising Leader, A Cave Was Once Home

Xi Jinping (left) who is poised to become China's next leader, spent seven years living in a cave home in the 1960s and '70s after his father fell from power.
Lan Hongguang Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Sun November 11, 2012 7:47 pm

Far from the political theater of China's Communist Party Congress in Beijing this week is a cave that the country's next leader once called home.

Just 15 at the time, Xi Jinping was sent by his family in Beijing to the remote rural village Liangjiahe in the hills of Shaanxi Province, hundreds of miles away, where for seven years he lived in a cave scooped out of the yellow loess hillsides.

He arrived there in 1968, after his father, a revolutionary fighter and former vice premier, had fallen from political favor.

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Local News
6:30 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Board rejects petition on PTSD medical pot removal

A petition aimed at removing post-traumatic stress disorder as a qualifier for medical marijuana in New Mexico has been rejected.

The New Mexico Medical Cannabis Advisory Board unanimously ruled Wednesday to reject the petition by an Albuquerque psychiatrist who said there was a lack of scientific evidence proving medical marijuana helped those with PTSD.

The board voted 7-0 to recommend that interim Health Secretary Brad McGrath reject the petition despite the claims.

About 3,300 New Mexicans used a PTSD diagnosis to qualify for a license.

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Local News
6:28 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

NM appeals court justice Castillo retiring

Gov. Susana Martinez, whose appointee to the Court of Appeals lost his seat in Tuesday's election, will get another shot at putting a Republican on the bench.

Court of Appeals Judge Celia Foy Castillo is retiring in December.

A bipartisan commission will consider applications for the position and then forward a list of candidates to the governor.

Judges then run in a partisan election if they want to keep their job. If they win, they face periodic nonpartisan retention elections.

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Local News
6:17 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Voter turnout drops to 62% in New Mexico

Voter turnout dropped in New Mexico and unofficial returns indicate about 62 percent of registered voters cast ballots in this year's presidential race.

That's down from nearly 70 percent in 2008, and it's the lowest turnout rate since the 2000 presidential election when 61 percent of eligible voters participated.

About 772,000 votes were cast in the presidential race. That's 7 percent lower than in 2008, but is 2 percent higher than in 2004.

New Mexico was a battleground state in the 2008 and 2004 presidential contests, but not this year.

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Local News
6:16 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

National group touts success of Native vote push

Organizers of a massive get-out-the-vote campaign that targeted Native American communities across the country are considering their efforts a success.

The National Congress of American Indians led the push. The group pointed Thursday to U.S. Senate races in Montana and North Dakota, as well as a voter identification ballot initiative in Minnesota, where it says the Native American turnout made a difference. The Minnesota voter ID requirement failed.

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Author Interviews
4:02 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

What Happens When Kids Fall 'Far From The Tree'

iStockphoto.com

As the old saying goes, the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. In other words, the child takes after the parent; the son is a chip off the old block.

Of course, that's often not the case. Straight parents have gay children and vice versa; autistic children are born to parents who don't have autism; and transgender kids are born to parents who are perfectly comfortable with their gender.

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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

CBO Warns Again: Ignoring Fiscal Cliff Could Result In Recession

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:57 pm

The so-called fiscal cliff is a double-edged sword, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office says in a new report issued today.

Why? Ignoring the huge tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect at the beginning of the year "will probably cause the economy to fall back into a recession."

But: "They will make the economy stronger later in the decade and beyond."

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Book Reviews
3:45 pm
Thu November 8, 2012

Giving Wing To A Story Of Climate Change

Barbara Kingsolver's previous books include The Poisonwood Bible and The Lacuna.
David Wood

Originally published on Fri May 31, 2013 7:43 am

The mercury hit 100 for ten consecutive days in some places last summer, and the drought of 2012 may be a preview of what climate change will bring: amber waves of extremely short corn.

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