Around the Nation
3:16 am
Sat February 16, 2013

The 'Baby Dolls' Of Mardi Gras A Fun Tradition With A Serious Side

The Baby Doll Ladies pose during Mardi Gras in New Orleans on Tuesday.
Skip Bolen Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 11:17 am

Just inside a room on the second floor of the Louisiana State Museum's Presbytere, there's a large baby doll dress, big enough for a woman to wear. And one did.

The costume and the baby bottle next to it belonged to 85-year-old Miriam Batiste Reed, who was known as a baby doll and one of the first women to parade in Mardi Gras. The bottle and the dress are part of a new exhibition, They Call Me Baby Doll: A Mardi Gras Tradition.

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Local News
7:03 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

US Sen Martin Heinrich Tackles Sequestration

U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich addressed a joint session of state legislators in Santa Fe Friday about several challenges facing him and his Congressional colleagues. 

KUNM's Deborah Martinez spoke with the senator, and she brings us part one of her report on looming budget cuts, known as sequestration.

 

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Local News
6:56 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Urban Orchards

Entrepreneur Dominique Dupont Harvesting Local Pears
Rita Daniels

With days getting longer, soon we can expect to see tiny blossoms popping up all over the place.  If we are lucky, and the Spring Thaw lasts, many of those flowers sprouting on trees will bear fruit.  Late last Summer KUNM's Rita Daniels spent some time with an Albuquerque entrepreneur who's made her career harvesting the abundance from the central Rio Grande Valley.

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Poverty and Public Health
6:10 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Indian Health Service Prepares For Sequestration

With the possibility of sequestration two weeks away, the Indian Health Services says they could be facing large cuts to program funding. Those cuts could be disastrous for the Indian Health Service which is already dealing with a massively underfunded budget.

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Local News
6:06 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Changes In U.S. Treasury May Give Some Exceptions

Beginning March 1st, the U.S. Treasury will stop issuing federal checks, like Disability or Social Security, forcing many beneficiaries to use a government issued debit card. However that change will allow some people without bank accounts to still receive checks.

Critics of the federal government’s move to make payments electronically instead of through paper checks say rural residents could be most impacted by the change.

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The Two-Way
4:50 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

For Australian Observatory, Asteroid 2012 DA14 Was Their Time In The Spotlight

This image shows asteroid 2012 DA14 and the Eta Carinae Nebula, with the white box highlighting the asteroid's path. The image was taken using a 3" refractor equipped with a color CCD camera. The telescope is located at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia and is maintained and owned by iTelescope.net.
Aaron Kingery NASA/MSFC

Originally published on Sat February 16, 2013 2:01 pm

If you watched any of NASA TV's live coverage of asteroid 2012 DA14 buzzing Earth today, you were looking at a live feed of a telescope at the Gingin Observatory in Western Australia.

Shortly after DA14 completed its fly by, Lakshmi Singh and Diane Waugh of our Newscast unit spoke to the motley crew of astronomers and technicians who made the live feed happen.

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Book Reviews
3:54 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Tales Of Transformation Make 'Vampires In The Lemon Grove' A Stunner

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 5:54 pm

In one of the eight stories in Karen Russell's new collection, a group of dead presidents has been reincarnated as horses. Rutherford B. Hayes, a skewbald pinto, frantically licks the palm of a girl in a secret code that he's worked out, revealing his true identity and asking her to alert the authorities. "Ha-ha!" the girl laughs. "That tickles."

I know, you're probably thinking: "Dead presidents reincarnated as horses? Oh, come on, Meg, that sounds like the plot of so many short stories."

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The Salt
3:32 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Romanian Horse Meat In British Lasagna Reveals Complex Global Food Trade

Not all countries in Europe shun horse meat, as the sign above this butcher shop in Paris attests. But horse-eating Europeans still don't like being swindled.
Jacques Brinon AP

Originally published on Sat February 16, 2013 5:35 am

How did the Romanian horse meat wind up in the British spaghetti sauce? Follow its path, and you'll get a quick tutorial in the complexities of the global food trade.

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Shots - Health News
3:23 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

What Nuclear Bombs Tell Us About Our Tendons

Nuclear bomb tests like this one, conducted at the Nevada Test Site in 1957, are helping scientists understand how the human body works.
Photo courtesy of National Nuclear Security Administration / Nevada Site Office

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 6:57 am

You really don't want to mess with your Achilles tendons. Trust us, injury to these tendons can take months to heal, and even then recovery is often not complete.

A big reason the Achilles is such a foot-dragger at getting better is that the tendon tissue we have as adults is basically the same as we had when we were teenagers.

That finding was published earlier this week in The FASEB Journal.

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Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
2:57 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

After Sandy, Not All Sand Dunes Are Created Equal

Daniel Riscoe, Jenna Hart, Anthony Chau and Caroline Lloyd (all students from the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J.) carry donated Christmas trees across Island Beach.
Adam Cole NPR

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:04 pm

When Superstorm Sandy hit Island Beach State Park — one of the last remnants of New Jersey's barrier island ecosystem — it flattened the dunes, pushing all that sand hundreds of feet inland.

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